Original Research

Comparative performance of traps in catching tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) in Tanzania

Imna I. Malele, Johnson O. Ouma, Hamisi S. Nyingilili, Winston A. Kitwika, Deusdedit J. Malulu, Henry B. Magwisha, Eliningeya J. Kweka
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 83, No 1 | a1057 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v83i1.1057 | © 2016 Imna I. Malele, Johnson O. Ouma, Hamisi S. Nyingilili, Winston A. Kitwika, Deusdedit J. Malulu, Henry B. Magwisha, Eliningeya J. Kweka | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 08 September 2015 | Published: 23 June 2016

About the author(s)

Imna I. Malele, Vector & Vector Borne Disease Institute, Tanga, Tanzania, United Republic of
Johnson O. Ouma, Biotechnology Research Institute, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Muguga, Kenya; Africa Technical Research Centre, Vector Health International, Arusha, Tanzania
Hamisi S. Nyingilili, Vector & Vector Borne Disease Institute, Tanga, Tanzania, United Republic of
Winston A. Kitwika, Vector & Vector-Borne Diseases Centre, Kigoma, Tanzania, United Republic of
Deusdedit J. Malulu, Vector & Vector Borne Disease Institute, Tanga, Tanzania, United Republic of
Henry B. Magwisha, Tanzania Veterinary Laboratory Agency, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, United Republic of
Eliningeya J. Kweka, Division of Livestock and Human Diseases Vector Control, Tropical Pesticides Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania; Department of Medical Parasitology and Entomology, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Mwanza, Tanzania


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Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the efficiency of different tsetse traps in 28 sites across Tanzania. The traps used were biconical, H, NGU, NZI, pyramidal, S3, mobile, and sticky panels. Stationary traps were deployed at a distance of 200 m apart and examined 72 h after deployment. The results showed that 117 (52.2%) out of the 224 traps deployed captured at least one Glossina species. A total of five Glossina species were captured, namely Glossina brevipalpis, Glossina pallidipes, Glossina swynnertoni, Glossina morsitans, and Glossina fuscipes martinii. Biconical traps caught tsetse flies in 27 sites, pyramidal in 26, sticky panel in 20, mobile in 19, S3 in 15, NGU in 7, H in 2 and NZI in 1. A total of 21 107 tsetse flies were trapped, with the most abundant species being G. swynnertoni (55.9%), followed by G. pallidipes (31.1%), G. fuscipes martinii (6.9%) and G. morsitans (6.0%). The least caught was G. brevipalpis (0.2%). The highest number of flies were caught by NGU traps (32.5%), followed by sticky panel (16%), mobile (15.4%), pyramidal (13.0%), biconical (11.3%) and S3 (10.2%). NZI traps managed to catch 0.9% of the total flies and H traps 0.7%. From this study, it can be concluded that the most efficient trap was NGU, followed by sticky panel and mobile, in that order. Therefore, for tsetse fly control programmes, NGU traps could be the better choice. Conversely, of the stationary traps, pyramidal and biconical traps captured tsetse flies in the majority of sites, covering all three ecosystems better than any other traps; therefore, they would be suitable for scouting for tsetse infestation in any given area, thus sparing the costs of making traps for each specific Glossina species.

Keywords: tseste; traps; densties; Glossina; mobile; stationary; Tanzania


Keywords

tseste; traps; densties; Glossina; mobile; stationary; Tanzania

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