Original Research

Comparing the minimum inhibitory and mutant prevention concentrations of selected antibiotics against animal isolates of Pasteurella multocida and Salmonella typhimurium

Jeanette M. Wentzel, Louise J. Biggs, Moritz van Vuuren
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 89, No 1 | a1955 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v89i1.1955 | © 2022 Jeanette M. Wentzel, Louise J. Biggs, Moritz van Vuuren | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 18 June 2021 | Published: 10 January 2022

About the author(s)

Jeanette M. Wentzel, Hans Hoheisen Research Station, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; and, Department of Veterinary Tropical Disease, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Louise J. Biggs, Department of Production Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Moritz van Vuuren, Department of Veterinary Tropical Disease, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Historically, the use of antibiotics was not well regulated in veterinary medicine. The emergence of antibiotic resistance (ABR) in pathogenic bacteria in human and veterinary medicine has driven the need for greater antibiotic stewardship. The preservation of certain antibiotic classes for use exclusively in humans, especially in cases of multidrug resistance, has highlighted the need for veterinarians to reduce its use and redefine dosage regimens of antibiotics to ensure efficacy and guard against the development of ABR pathogens. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the lowest concentration of an antibiotic drug that will prevent the growth of a bacterium, is recognised as a method to assist in antibiotic dosage determination. Minimum inhibitory concentrations sometimes fail to deal with first-step mutants in bacterial populations; therefore dosing regimens based solely on MIC can lead to the development of ABR. The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is the minimum inhibitory antibiotic concentration of the most resistant first-step mutant. Mutant prevention concentration determination as a complementary and sometimes preferable alternative to MIC determination for veterinarians when managing bacterial pathogens. The results of this study focused on livestock pathogens and antibiotics used to treat them, which had a MIC value of 0.25 µg/mL for enrofloxacin against all 27 isolates of Salmonella typhimurium. The MPC values were 0.50 µg/mL, with the exception of five isolates that had MPC values of 4.00 µg/mL. The MPC test yielded 65.52% (18 isolates) Salmonella isolates with florfenicol MICs in the sensitive range, while 11 isolates were in the resistant range. Seventeen isolates (58.62%) of Pasteurella multocida had MIC values in the susceptible range and 41.38% (12 isolates) had an intermediate MIC value. Mutant prevention concentration determinations as done in this study is effective for the antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections and minimising the development of resistance. The MPC method can be used to better control to prevent the development of antibiotic drug resistance used in animals.

Keywords

minimum inhibitory concentration; MIC; mutant prevention concentration; MPC; animals; Salmonella; Pasteurella

Metrics

Total abstract views: 928
Total article views: 660

 

Crossref Citations