Original Research

Endemic stability for Theileria parva infections in Ankole calves of the Ankole ranching scheme, Uganda

F.M. Kivaria, C. Heuer, F. Jongejan, J. Okello-Onen, T. Rutagwenda, F. Unger, W. Boehle
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 71, No 3 | a259 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v71i3.259 | © 2004 F.M. Kivaria, C. Heuer, F. Jongejan, J. Okello-Onen, T. Rutagwenda, F. Unger, W. Boehle | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 08 November 2004 | Published: 08 November 2004

About the author(s)

F.M. Kivaria,
C. Heuer,
F. Jongejan,
J. Okello-Onen,
T. Rutagwenda,
F. Unger,
W. Boehle,

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Abstract

A population-based study was carried out on the Ankole ranching scheme in south-west Uganda with the aim of determining the endemic status of Theileria parva infections. For this purpose, the age-related sero-prevalence of T. parva and the specific calf mortality associated with the parasite were assessed. Blood samples were collected from 931 Ankole calves of up to 12 months of age from 81 randomly selected herds. The relationship between rainfall pattern and whole-body Rhipicephalus appendiculatus counts was determined.
The influence of tick control practices on East Coast fever-related calf mortality, and sero-positivity were also determined. A significant (r2 = 0.76, P = 0.000) association between R. appendiculatus counts and rainfall was observed. There was no significant (P > 0.05) association between theileriosis- related calf mortality, sero-positivity and the different tick control practices. Antibody prevalence based on the PIM ELISA was above 70 % among calves of 6 months of age in 96 % in all the herds.
Theileria parva-related calf mortality determined by repeated herd visits and farm records ranged between 0% and 5.4 %. It was concluded that endemic stability for theileriosis, caused by T. parva, existed in the study area, and that the risk of the occurrence of economically important outbreaks of East Coast fever in indigenous cattle was regarded as minimal under the prevailing conditions.

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Crossref Citations

1. Is endemic stability of tick-borne disease in cattle a useful concept?
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