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‘One Health’ infectious diseases surveillance in Tanzania: Are we all on board the same flight?

Erasto V. Mbugi, Kim A. Kayunze, Bugwesa Z. Katale, Sharon Kendall, Liam Good, Gibson S. Kibik, Julius D. Keyyu, Peter Godfrey-Faussett, Paul van Helden, Mecky I. Matee
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 79, No 2 | a500 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v79i2.500 | © 2012 Erasto V. Mbugi, Kim A. Kayunze, Bugwesa Z. Katale, Sharon Kendall, Liam Good, Gibson S. Kibik, Julius D. Keyyu, Peter Godfrey-Faussett, Paul van Helden, Mecky I. Matee | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 01 July 2012 | Published: 19 July 2012

About the author(s)

Erasto V. Mbugi, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania, United Republic of
Kim A. Kayunze, School of Public Health and Social Sciences, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania, United Republic of
Bugwesa Z. Katale, Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania, United Republic of
Sharon Kendall, The Royal Veterinary College, London, United Kingdom
Liam Good, The Royal Veterinary College, London, United Kingdom
Gibson S. Kibik, Kilimanjaro Clinical Research Institute, Tumaini University, Tanzania, United Republic of
Julius D. Keyyu, Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania, United Republic of
Peter Godfrey-Faussett, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
Paul van Helden, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Tuberculosis Research/MRC Centre of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa
Mecky I. Matee, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania, United Republic of


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Abstract

Infectious diseases account for nearly 40% of the burden of human mortality and morbidity in low-income countries, of which 7% is attributable to zoonoses and 13% to recently emerging diseases from animals. One of the strategic approaches for effective surveillance, monitoring and control of infectious diseases compromising health in both humans and animals could be through a combination of multiple disciplines. The approach can be achieved through a joint effort from stakeholders comprising health professionals (medical and veterinary), social, economic, agricultural, environmental and other interested parties. With resource scarcity in terms of number of staff, skills and facility in low-income countries, participatory multi- sectoral and multidisciplinary approaches in limiting the burden of zoonotic diseases could be worthwhile. We review challenging issues that may limit the ‘One Health’ approach for infectious diseases surveillance in Tanzania with a focus on Health Policy and how best the human and animal health systems could be complemented or linked to suit the community in need for disease control under the theme’s context.

Keywords

One Health; infections; surveillance; Tanzania

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