Research Communication

Nematodes of the small intestine of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

William A. Taylor, John D. Skinner, Joop Boomker
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 80, No 1 | a562 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v80i1.562 | © 2013 William A. Taylor, John D. Skinner, Joop Boomker | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 08 January 2013 | Published: 16 May 2013

About the author(s)

William A. Taylor, Centre for Veterinary Wildlife Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, United States of America
John D. Skinner, Centre for Veterinary Wildlife Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa
Joop Boomker, Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, University of Pretoria, South Africa Department of Zoology, University of Johannesburg, South Africa


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Abstract

The abundance and distribution of parasitic helminths in populations of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, have not been well documented. A total of 28 buffaloes of different ages and sexeswere sampled in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, for nematodes of the small intestine. Three nematode species were identified, namely Cooperia fuelleborni, Cooperia hungi and Trichostrongylus deflexus, with C. hungi being a new country record for African buffalo in South Africa. The overall prevalence was 71%and the average number of worms was 2346 (range: 0–15 980). This is a small burden for such a large mammal. Sex, age and body condition of the buffaloes had no significant effect on worm occurrence.

Keywords

helminth; African buffalo; Cooperia

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