Proceedings

Practice of One Health approaches: Bridges and barriers in Tanzania

Kim A. Kayunze, Angwara Kiwara, Eligius Lyamuya, Dominic M. Kambarage, Jonathan Rushton, Richard Coker, Richard Kock
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 81, No 2 | a733 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v81i2.733 | © 2014 Kim A. Kayunze, Angwara Kiwara, Eligius Lyamuya, Dominic M. Kambarage, Jonathan Rushton, Richard Coker, Richard Kock | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 05 December 2013 | Published: 23 April 2014

About the author(s)

Kim A. Kayunze, Rural Development, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania and Postdoctoral Research Fellow in One Health Policy, Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance (SACIDS)
Angwara Kiwara, Development Studies, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Institute of Development Studies, Tanzania, United Republic of
Eligius Lyamuya, Microbiology and Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academics, Research and Consultancy), Muhimbili University College of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Tanzania, United Republic of
Dominic M. Kambarage, Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania, United Republic of
Jonathan Rushton, Animal Health Economics, Royal Veterinary College, United Kingdom
Richard Coker, Public Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
Richard Kock, Wildlife Health and Emerging Diseases, CEEED, Royal Veterinary College, United Kingdom


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Abstract

The practice of one health approaches in human and animal health programmes is influenced by type and scope of bridges and barriers for partnerships. It was thus essential to evaluate the nature and scope of collaborative arrangements among human, animal, and wildlife health experts in dealing with health challenges which demand inter-sectoral partnership. The nature of collaborative arrangement was assessed, and the respective bridges and barriers over a period of 12 months (July 20011 to June 2012) were identified. The specific objectives were to: (1) determine the proportion of health experts who had collaborated with other experts of disciplines different from theirs, (2) rank the general bridges for and barriers against collaboration according to the views of the health experts, and (3) find the actual bridges for and barriers against collaboration among the health experts interviewed. It was found that 27.0% of animal health officers interviewed had collaborated with medical officers while 12.4% of the medical officers interviewed had collaborated with animal health experts. Only 6.7% of the wildlife officers had collaborated with animal health experts. The main bridges for collaboration were instruction by upper level leaders, zoonotic diseases of serious impacts, and availability of funding. The main barriers for collaboration were lack of knowledge about animal/human health issues, lack of networks for collaboration, and lack of plans to collaborate. This thus calls for the need to curb barriers in order to enhance inter-sectoral collaboration for more effective management of risks attributable to infectious diseases of humans and animals.


Keywords

Infectious diseases, practice of one health approaches, bridges and barriers to practice of one health approaches

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Crossref Citations

1. One Health Integration: A Proposed Framework for a Study on Veterinarians and Zoonotic Disease Management in Ghana
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doi: 10.3389/fvets.2018.00085