Original Research

Taeniasis in non-descript dogs in Ngorongoro, Tanzania: Prevalence and predisposing factors

Emmanuel S. Swai, Miran B. Miran, Ayubu A. Kasuku, Jahashi Nzalawahe
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 83, No 1 | a1013 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v83i1.1013 | © 2016 Emmanuel S. Swai, Miran B. Miran, Ayubu A. Kasuku, Jahashi Nzalawahe | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 16 July 2015 | Published: 24 May 2016

About the author(s)

Emmanuel S. Swai, Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries Development, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania, United Republic of
Miran B. Miran, Livestock Department, Ngorongoro District Council, Tanzania, United Republic of
Ayubu A. Kasuku, Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania, United Republic of
Jahashi Nzalawahe, Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania, United Republic of


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Abstract

The prevalence of taeniasis was determined during the period January to April 2013 in a cross-sectional study of non-descript domestic dogs from the livestock–wildlife ecosystem of Ngorongoro, Tanzania. Taeniid eggs were determined by screening faecal samples using the formalin-ether sedimentation technique. Predisposing factors for dog infection were assessed in relation to demographic, husbandry and management data. Of the 205 faecal samples screened, 150 (73.2%) were positive for taeniid eggs. The prevalence of dogs harbouring taeniid eggs was 80%, 30.2% and 75.3% in the less than 1 year, 1–3 years and greater than 3 years of age groups, respectively. Age group and sex prevalence in dogs did not differ significantly (P > 0.05), although the females showed a marginally higher prevalence (73.8%) in comparison to the males (72.7%). Taeniid eggs were significantly more likely to be found in the faeces of dogs located in Waso (80.6%) and Endulen (75%) than in Malambo (63.2%, P < 0.05). The study revealed that dogs owned and raised by agro-pastoralists were at a lower risk of acquiring Taenia spp. infection (P = 0.001) than those that were raised by pastoralists. The majority of dog owners were not aware of the predisposing factors and the mode of transmission of taeniids. Dogs were frequently fed on viscera, trimmings and the heads of slaughtered animals, and they were not treated for parasitic infections. The findings of this study indicate that taeniasis is prevalent among non-descript dogs in Ngorongoro, underscoring the need for further research and active surveillance to better understand the transmission cycle of Taenia spp. in a wider geographical area in Tanzania.


Keywords

dogs; ngorongoro; prevalence; risk factors; Taeniasis;Tanzania

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