Original Research

Medicinal plants used to control internal and external parasites in goats

Marcia Sanhokwe, Johnfisher Mupangwa, Patrick J. Masika, Viola Maphosa, Voster Muchenje
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 83, No 1 | a1016 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v83i1.1016 | © 2016 Marcia Sanhokwe, Johnfisher Mupangwa, Patrick J. Masika, Viola Maphosa, Voster Muchenje | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 17 July 2015 | Published: 29 April 2016

About the author(s)

Marcia Sanhokwe, Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare Alice, South Africa
Johnfisher Mupangwa, Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare Alice, South Africa
Patrick J. Masika, Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare Alice, South Africa; Fort Cox College of Agriculture and Forestry, Middledrift, South Africa
Viola Maphosa, Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare Alice, South Africa
Voster Muchenje, Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare Alice, South Africa


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Abstract

The use of medicinal plants plays a major role in the primary health care of animals in South Africa. A survey was conducted to document medicinal plants used to control parasites in goats in Kwezi and Ntambethemba villages in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Information from 50 farmers and 3 herbalists was obtained through the use of a structured questionnaire, and a snowball sampling technique was used to identify key informants. The obtained data were analysed using PROC FREQ of SAS (2003), and fidelity level values were determined to estimate the healing potential of the mentioned plants. The survey revealed nine plant species belonging to eight families that were used to control parasites in goats. Asphodelaceae (22.22%) was the most frequently used plant family. Leaves were the most used plant parts, constituting 60.38%. They were prepared either as infusions or decoctions of single plants or in mixtures. Aloe ferox, Acokanthera oppositifolia and Elephantorrhiza elephantina were the plants having the highest fidelity level for their use to control parasites, each scoring 100%, followed by Albuca setosa (83.33%). The study revealed low knowledge about ethnoveterinary medicine in the study area. It also revealed that information on ethno-veterinary medicine in this area is mostly confined to older people and there is danger that this knowledge can be lost before being passed on to other generations. Therefore, there is an urgent need to document information on these plant species so that the future generation can benefit. Further investigation should be carried out to validate the efficacy and safety of the above-mentioned plants so as to provide cheap alternative ways of controlling parasites.

Keywords: ailments; ethno-veterinary practices; small ruminant; traditional medicine


Keywords

ailments; ethno-veterinary practices; small ruminant; traditional medicine

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Crossref Citations

1. Elephantorrhiza elephantina: Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, and Pharmacology of an Important Medicinal Plant Species in Southern Africa
Alfred Maroyi
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine  vol: 2017  first page: 1  year: 2017  
doi: 10.1155/2017/6403905