Original Research

A survey of tick control methods used by resource-poor farmers in the Qwa-Qwa area of the eastern Free State Province, South Africa

M. Hlatshwayo, P.A. Mbati
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 72, No 3 | a202 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v72i3.202 | © 2005 M. Hlatshwayo, P.A. Mbati | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 15 September 2005 | Published: 15 September 2005

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M. Hlatshwayo,
P.A. Mbati,

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Abstract

A survey conducted in five villages in a resource-poor farming community in Qwa-Qwa, using the rapid rural appraisal technique and a questionnaire survey, showed that a significant proportion of the farmers (84 %) use traditional or alternative methods to control ectoparasites, while 16 % use commercial acaricides (c2 = 7.1; P < 0.05). Alternative control methods included the use of used engine oil, household disinfectant and paraffin. Killing of ticks was the main reason for control (40 %), with disease control being second (20 %). Other reasons given for controlling ticks were to prevent damage to teats, to provide animals with a clean appearance and to protect hides. Some 40 % of farmers were aware of the effects of ticks on their animals. There is a need for farmer education that will provide information on integrated tick management and its advantages over absolute reliance on commercial acaricides.

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