Original Research

Safety and immunogenicity of Onderstepoort Biological Products’ Rift Valley fever Clone 13 vaccine in sheep and goats under field conditions in Senegal

Modou M. Lo, Victor Mbao, Pascale Sierra, Yaya Thiongane, Mariame Diop, Meritxell Donadeu, Baptiste Dungu
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research | Vol 82, No 1 | a857 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ojvr.v82i1.857 | © 2015 Modou M. Lo, Victor Mbao, Pascale Sierra, Yaya Thiongane, Mariame Diop, Meritxell Donadeu, Baptiste Dungu | This work is licensed under CC Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0
Submitted: 26 July 2014 | Published: 29 May 2015

About the author(s)

Modou M. Lo, Laboratoire National de l’Elevage et de Recherches Vétérinaires, Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles, Dakar, Senegal
Victor Mbao, Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines, Malawi
Pascale Sierra, Independent Veterinary Consultant, Gerstheim, France
Yaya Thiongane, Laboratoire National de l’Elevage et de Recherches Vétérinaires, Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles, Dakar, Senegal
Mariame Diop, Laboratoire National de l’Elevage et de Recherches Vétérinaires, Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles, Dakar, Senegal
Meritxell Donadeu, Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines, Scotland
Baptiste Dungu, Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines, Scotland


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Abstract

This blinded field safety study was conducted in Senegal to assess safety and immunogenicity of administration of the registered dose of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) Clone 13 vaccine (Onderstepoort Biological Products) to sheep and goats of West African breeds under natural conditions. A total of 267 small ruminants (220 sheep, 47 goats) were included; half received RVFV Clone 13 vaccine at the recommended dose and half received the diluent (as placebo) only. The study was performed on three commercial farms in the northern and eastern region of Senegal in accordance with veterinary good clinical practices. The animals were observed daily for 3 days after vaccination, and then weekly for 1 year. In both sheep and goats vaccinated against RVFV seroconversion rates above 70% were recorded. No seroconversion related to RVFV was observed in placebo-treated animals. No statistically significant differences were determined between placebo and vaccinated groups for mean rectal temperatures for the first 3 days after administration (p > 0.05). No abnormal clinical signs related to treatment were noted, and only one slight injection site reaction was observed in one vaccinated animal for 2 days after vaccination. Out of 176 births assessed over 1 year (93 from the vaccinated group, 83 from the placebo group), 9 were abnormal in the placebo group and 3 in the vaccinated group (p > 0.05). The frequency of adverse events was similar in the placebo and vaccinated groups. RVFV Clone 13 vaccine administered according to the manufacturer’s instructions was safe and well tolerated in West African breeds of sheep and goats, including animals of approximately 6 months of age and pregnant females, under field conditions in Senegal. Antibody levels persisted up to 1 year after vaccination.

Keywords

RVF Clone 13 Vaccine; sheep; goat; small ruminant; safety; Senegal; West Africa.

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Crossref Citations

1. Safety and Efficacy Profile of Commercial Veterinary Vaccines against Rift Valley Fever: A Review Study
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doi: 10.1155/2016/7346294